Our Winter 2021 Elective Suggestions!


Hey PISA Community! Now that course selection is right around the corner we wanted to share our “Winter 2021 Elective Suggestions”. These are classes that have been hand selected by our PISA team that we know can broaden the knowledge of those studying Politics and International Studies at Bishop’s. These are simply suggestions based on our personal knowledge on the courses, and we hope you will keep them in mind during course selection. Of course, you are able to take any electives that interest you, but these are courses that may have some form of political aspect, or can count towards your POL degree in some way. Enjoy!



HIS105 The 20th Century World:


The 20th century has been an age of extremes. It has witnessed the rise of human rights, great economic and social transformations, and wars of unprecedented severity. Topics to be discussed include the rise of totalitarian movements, notably fascism and communism, warfare, decolonization, economic crisis, the genocides of the 20th century in Europe and Asia, and the post-1945 East-West schism.


REL200 Politics and Religion:


This course examines the intersection between extremist religious beliefs and political power, predominantly but not exclusively those cases in which violence and serious conflict have arisen. Topics include: radical Zionist settlers in the West Bank; the triumph of Islamic theocracy in Iran; conservative Christian evangelicals in the United States; radical Islamist groups (e.g., ISIS, Al Qaeda and the Taliban).


PHI 348 Topics in Social and Political Philosophy:


This course will typically consist of a detailed study of a great work of Western social and political philosophy. Students will be expected to present seminars and do research on the text itself, the social and political context in which it emerged and its implications for all serious inquiry into questions of society and politics.


ECO280 Contemporary Perspectives in Political Economy.


This course develops core contemporary perspectives in political economy within an international context. This course is neither a course in political science nor a course in economics, but rather a course that stresses the interaction of the two disciplines. Prerequisites: ECO 102 and ECO 103


ESG 126 Introduction to Human Geography.


An introduction to the field of human geography; its scope and methods. The aim is to focus on the relationship between people and their environment, including population trends, resource use, political and economic forces and urban planning.


BMG100 Understanding Business and Societies.


With the onset of Globalization, the rapidly improving economic conditions have led to many inequities and issues rising to the forefront. Income inequality, environmental protection and regulations, cultural extinction are just some of the many issues that are impacting all stakeholders. As businesses, governments and workers attempt to balance growth and increases in productivity to improve standards of living with social and economic costs, understanding multiple viewpoints will be critical to ensuring the future of this planet. In this class, you will be drawn into these debates and explore the underlying perspectives related to theories of society and human nature and in their value presuppositions.


BMG 215 Introduction to International Business.


This introductory course is designed to expose the student to the international business environment and its current patterns. The major theories of international business transactions are examined including the critical institutions that influence and facilitate international trade. These dynamic factors as well as the pressures of globalization are reviewed in the context of overall corporate policy. The course also briefly develops the important international issues within the framework of the various functional disciplines of management. Prerequisites: BMG 100 and BMK 211

CLA229 War and Society in the Greek and Roman World.


War, omnipresent in the ancient Mediterranean, will be used to reveal socio- economic, religious, and cultural aspects of ancient Greek and Roman societies. Was war waged for economic motives (plunder, booty, supply in slaves, exploitation of local resources...)? Were there sacred wars? How did war affect art and architecture? How did encounters with other societies change the perception of war and bring about an evolution in warfare? How was war declared? What is known of diplomacy, peace-talks and treaties between allies or former enemies? This course is not about wars but about the impacts war had on society and how society changed the ways to wage war. Open to first-year students.


FRE100 French 1.


Introduction to the basic structures of the French language. Emphasis is put on pronunciation, exchange of personal information, expressions using the present tense and the near future, knowledge and description of surroundings, and the various question forms. Designed for students who have no or almost no previous knowledge of French. Prerequisite: according to result in placement test

Antirequisite: previously FRA 131 or FRE 131 or FRE 137


REL127 Islam: Submission to Allah.


The history, literature, ideas and practices of Islam from its origins to the present. Topics include: pre-Islamic Arabia; the life, example and practices of the Prophet Muhammad; the Qur’an; the caliphate and the ummah; sunnah and Hadith; the Five Pillars and worship; shari‘ah; Sufism and the mystical tradition; Sunni and Shiite; women in Islam; art and architecture in Islam; Islam and modernity.


ECO280 Contemporary Perspectives in Political Economy.


This course develops core contemporary perspectives in political economy within an international context. This course is neither a course in political science nor a course in economics, but rather a course that stresses the interaction of the two disciplines. Prerequisites: ECO 102 and ECO 103 Offered in rotation with ECO 251


ENG358 Approaches to Indigenous Literacy Cultures in Canada.


This course will examine theoretical approaches to Indigenous literatures in Canada. It will begin by looking at literary developments from oral to contemporary written literary forms, and how the latter developed in response to colonial contact. Authors may include Thomas King, Lenore Keeshig Tobias, Eden Robinson, Armand Ruffo, Warren Cariou, and Tomson Highway.





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